A history of women fighting for their rights

Most of the delegates to the Seneca Falls Convention agreed: American women were autonomous individuals who deserved their own political identities. Almost immediately after the war ended, the 14th Amendment and the 15th Amendment to the Constitution raised familiar questions of suffrage and citizenship. Some woman-suffrage advocates, among them Stanton and Susan B.

A history of women fighting for their rights

Colonial era[ edit ] A stamp honoring Virginia Darewho in became the first English child born in what became the U. Colonial history of the United States The experiences of women during the colonial era varied from colony to colony, but there were some overall patterns.

Most of the British settlers were from England and Wales, with smaller numbers from Scotland and Ireland. Groups of families settled together in New England, while families tended to settle independently in the Southern colonies.

The American colonies absorbed several thousands of Dutch and Swedish settlers. Aftermost immigrants to Colonial America arrived as indentured servants —young unmarried men and women seeking a new life in a much richer environment. Food supplies were much more abundant than in Europe, and there was an abundance of fertile land that needed farm families.

However, the disease environment was hostile in the malaria-ridden South, where a large portion of the arrivals died within five years. The American-born children were immune from the fatal forms of malaria. They believed a woman should dedicate herself to rearing God-fearing children to the best of her ability.

There were ethnic differences in the treatment of women. Among Puritan settlers in New England, wives almost never worked in the fields with their husbands. In German communities in Pennsylvania, however, many women worked in fields and stables. German and Dutch immigrants granted women more control over property, which was not permitted in the local English law.

A Brief History of Women's Rights Movements | Scholastic

Unlike English colonial wives, German and Dutch wives owned their own clothes and other items and were also given the ability to write wills disposing of the property brought into the marriage. The first English people to arrive in America were the members of the Roanoke Colony who came to North Carolina in Julywith 17 women, 91 men, and 9 boys as the founding colonists.

On August 18,Virginia Dare was born; she was the first English child born in the territory of the United States. Women in 17th-century New England and History of New England The New England regional economy grew rapidly in the 17th century, thanks to heavy immigration, high birth rates, low death rates, and an abundance of inexpensive farmland.

Between andabout 20, Puritans arrived, settling mostly near Boston; after fewer than fifty immigrants a year arrived. The average size of a completed family — was 7. About 27 percent of the population comprised men between 16 and 60 years old.

The growing population led to shortages of good farm land on which young families could establish themselves; one result was to delay marriage, and another was to move to new lands further west.

In the towns and cities, there was strong entrepreneurship, and a steady increase in the specialization of labor.

A history of women fighting for their rights

Wages for men went up steadily before ; new occupations were opening for women, including weaving, teaching, and tailoring. The region bordered New Francewhich used Indian warriors to attack outlying villages. Women were sometimes captured. In the numerous French and Indian Wars the British government poured money in to purchase supplies, build roads and pay colonial soldiers.

The coastal ports began to specialize in fishing, international trade and shipbuilding—and after in whaling.

A history of women fighting for their rights

Combined with a growing urban markets for farm products, these factors allowed the economy to flourish despite the lack of technological innovation. It was optional and some towns proved reluctant. Northampton, Massachusetts, for example, was a late adopter because it had many rich families who dominated the political and social structures and they did not want to pay taxes to aid poor families.

Northampton assessed taxes on all households, rather than only on those with children, and used the funds to support a grammar school to prepare boys for college.

Not until after did Northampton educate girls with public money. In contrast, the town of Sutton, Massachusetts, was diverse in terms of social leadership and religion at an early point in its history. Sutton paid for its schools by means of taxes on households with children only, thereby creating an active constituency in favor of universal education for both boys and girls.

School taught both, but in places without schools reading was mainly taught to boys and also a few privileged girls. Men handled worldly affairs and needed to read and write.

Girls only needed to read especially religious materials. This educational disparity between reading and writing explains why the colonial women often could read, but could not write so they used an "X" to sign their names. Gutierrez finds a high level of illegitimacy, especially among the Indians who were used as slaves.

Depending on the perspective, she has been viewed as either the civilized princess or the destructive squaw. A highly favorable image has surrounded Pocahontasthe daughter of the Native American chief Powhatan in Virginia. She was taken hostage by the colonists inwhen she was seventeen.August 26th marks Women's Equality Day, a national holiday celebrating women getting the right to vote in The fight for equal rights began long before the 19th Amendment passed.

But even after the 19th Amendment became law, women still fought (and fight) for equal rights everywhere, whether it's ensuring access to contraceptives or fair pay in the workplace.

Fighting for Women's Rights

In the s, women fought for the rights to vote and be considered equal partners to men. Encompassed in equality, women fought for the right to own property, keep wages and sign a contract. Before the suffrage movement that took place during many decades in the s, women . Watch video · The next year, the Civil Rights Act of prohibited discrimination on the basis of race, origin, color, religion or sex.

There have been more legal wins for female workers since then. Women's rights movements are primarily concerned with making the political, social, and economic status of women equal to that of men and with establishing legislative safeguards against discrimination on .

The campaign for state ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment provided the opportunity for millions of women across the nation to become actively involved in the Women’s Rights Movement in .

Oct 29,  · Watch video · The women’s suffrage movement was a decades-long fight to win the right to vote for women in the United States. It took activists .

A Brief History of Women's Fight for Equal Pay